This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more about cookies on this website and how to delete cookies, see our Cookie Policy.
Analytics

Tools which collect anonymous data to enable us to see how visitors use our site and how it performs. We use this to improve our products, services and user experience.

Essential

Tools that enable essential services and functionality, including identity verification, service continuity and site security.

Where Taxpayers and Advisers Meet

Search found 774 matches

Go to advanced search

by AGoodman
Wed Jun 26, 2019 3:45 pm
Forum: International Tax
Topic: Worldwide Disclosure Facility for non UK resident.
Replies: 5
Views: 73

Re: Worldwide Disclosure Facility for non UK resident.

You could try ringing them up and telling them you have been non-resident for X years. They may accept that or insist on a letter (no right to insist but better to comply and get rid of it).
by AGoodman
Wed Jun 26, 2019 3:37 pm
Forum: Income Tax
Topic: A challenging International Income Question - Help
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: A challenging International Income Question - Help

If the income is paid to you it will be a dividend and you will be subject to income tax to the extent it is not absorbed by your dividend allowance of £2,000. The underlying income could be at risk of direct attribution to you under the "transfer of assets abroad" legislation but you should have a ...
by AGoodman
Mon Jun 24, 2019 5:51 pm
Forum: Property Taxation
Topic: Declaration of Trust, SDLT and expense allocation.
Replies: 3
Views: 84

Re: Declaration of Trust, SDLT and expense allocation.

Yes, SDLT is possible depending on the values. Your wife would be treated as paying Whether SDLT was payable has nothing to do with the allocation of expenses. It's a separate issue. By the sounds of it, your wife is taxed on 99% of the income, I don't know if she can deduct 99% of the interest or j...
by AGoodman
Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:39 am
Forum: Inheritance Tax, IHT, Trusts & Estates, Capital Taxes
Topic: Children's education
Replies: 4
Views: 203

Re: Children's education

Sure, there's nothing that says it has to be in instalments.
by AGoodman
Wed Jun 19, 2019 6:21 pm
Forum: Income Tax
Topic: Self-Employment Income Tax
Replies: 3
Views: 170

Re: Self-Employment Income Tax

Your tax residency and immigration status is entirely separate. Tax residence depends on your links to the UK (home/family/work) and the time you spent in the country during the tax years 2017/18 (6 April to 5 April) and 2018/19. I would be surprised if you were not tax resident in the UK (and so li...
by AGoodman
Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:43 pm
Forum: Capital Gains Tax, CGT
Topic: More than one transfer
Replies: 1
Views: 120

Re: More than one transfer

Personally, I don't see how he can benefit from PPR at all. s.223(2) (a) + (b) refer to "period of ownership" - singular - rather than "periods of ownership".

I believe there may be other views on the forum
by AGoodman
Mon Jun 17, 2019 4:00 pm
Forum: Property Taxation
Topic: Overages
Replies: 2
Views: 111

Re: Overages

Sounds pretty clear cut CGT to me - there aren't any factors that would suggest an income tax treatment.

May not be much point in getting clearance after the fact.
by AGoodman
Fri Jun 14, 2019 4:41 pm
Forum: Capital Gains Tax, CGT
Topic: Entrepreneurs Relief
Replies: 3
Views: 149

Re: Entrepreneurs Relief

This is a matter of taste but I would only go into SEIS/EIS if you are attracted to EIS on investment grounds or benefit from the income tax benefits as well.

Failing that, it seems unattractive to lock up your money in illiquid high risk investments to save 10% tax.
by AGoodman
Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:10 am
Forum: Business Tax
Topic: CGT
Replies: 1
Views: 92

Re: CGT

No, assuming:

1. residential property is not involved (i.e. not held by the company); and
2. you do not return to the UK within 5 tax years (if you do, you could be liable for the tax on your return).
by AGoodman
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:34 pm
Forum: Income Tax
Topic: Contributions to my daughter
Replies: 5
Views: 131

Re: Contributions to my daughter

Just in case there are any misconceptions, you are free to give more than £3k a year. The excess would not be subject to income tax. It would only come into account for inheritance tax if you died within 7 years of making the gift. A lot of people forget that it is also subject to inheritance tax if...

Go to advanced search