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Where Taxpayers and Advisers Meet

Landlords expenses uk, prior to letting.

jim1980
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2018 8:30 am

Landlords expenses uk, prior to letting.

Postby jim1980 » Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:45 am

Hi
Got a question about how to account for landlords expenses in
the uk , using the cash basis accounting for 2017-2018

I bought a house as a buy to let ( paid the extra Stamp duty !!!! )
in 2017. Stayed there for two months getting it ready to let.
I had an electrical inspection done, 2 months prior to letting my house out.
Gas inspection 2 months prior to letting, and landlord’s insurance 2 months prior to letting
Can I clam the full amount for these, or only part, or none of these costs ?!!!!!!!!!!!!!
If I can clam part, is say, the cost split into months ok, like 10 months worth of insurance, gas cert, and electrical check costs, would that be excepted by the uk tax office.
or is it a dead duck, because its all prior to letting.
Anyone ?
Thanks
Jim.

someone
Posts: 384
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:09 am

Re: Landlords expenses uk, prior to letting.

Postby someone » Tue Nov 20, 2018 2:23 pm

As noone else has replied I'll try.

Expenses incurred prior to the first let, (within 7 years I think) that are wholly and exclusively incurred for letting can be claimed as if they were incurred on the first day of the letting business. (if you already have a letting business then they are accounted for as normal even if they're on a property that isn't yet let and not on the date the new property is first let)

I think you can claim the items you mention - but the test isn't always intuitive (to me) and the fact that you stayed there might complicate things (I don't know)


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